Latest Rockin’ Article

Jul
0

Article Synopsis: The High Price of Customer Satisfaction

MIT Sloan Management Review

March 18, 2014   Magazine: Spring 2014

Timothy Keiningham, Sunil Gupta, Lerzan Aksoy and Alexander Buoye

Highly satisfied customers = revenue dollars. Or do they?  Some data has shown that the relationship between customer satisfaction and customer spending behavior is surprisingly weak. 1 In this article, the authors share their analysis of the relationship between satisfaction and business outcomes, gathering data from more than 100,000 consumers covering more than 300 brands.   This data came from two sources, the American Satisfaction Index data (2000-2009) which are measures of stock returns, appended with market shares of these companies, and consumer satisfaction ratings and customer spending levels across 315 brands.2

This analysis revealed three critical issues that have an impact on correlating customer satisfaction to positive business outcomes.  1) There is a downside to continually devoting resources to raise customer satisfaction levels; 2) High satisfaction is a strong negative predictor of future market share; 3) Knowing a customer’s satisfaction level tells you almost nothing about how customer spending will be divided among the different brands used.

The authors share strategies to align customer satisfaction and profitability that companies should understand and implement as follows:

“Value to the Company vs. Value to the Customer—research and analyze your customers’ satisfaction levels with your product to the product’s profitability.”

“Market Share vs. Customer Satisfaction—begin with an analysis of customers’ satisfaction levels with not only your company but also with your competitors, as well as your and your competitors’ market shares.”

“Satisfaction and Customer Advantage—what really matters is whether or not your customer satisfaction rating is higher for your brand than for competing brands that a customer also uses.”

The authors conclude that increasing satisfaction levels can be a component of a company’s strategy, but perspective is needed.  In fact, a company may need to accept lower satisfaction scores from a smaller group of customers, in order to increase market share within a larger less homogenous group.  For researchers conducting customer satisfaction research, this context provides some fresh inspiration about how to weave conventional satisfaction research with additional data sources.

References

1 J. Hofmeyr, V. Goodall, M. Bongers and P. Holtzman, “A New Measure of Brand Attitudinal Equity Based on the Zipf Distribution,” International Journal of Market Research 50, no. 2 (2008): 181-202; and A.W. Mägi, “Share of Wallet in Retailing: The Effects of Customer Satisfaction, Loyalty Cards and Shopper Characteristics,” Journal of Retailing 79, no. 2 (2003): 97-106.

2 Some examples cited include: L. Aksoy, A. Buoye, P. Aksoy, B. Larivière and T. L. Keiningham, “A Cross-National Investigation of the Satisfaction and Loyalty Linkage for Mobile Telecommunications Services Across Eight Countries,” Journal of Interactive Marketing 27, no. 1 (February 2013): 74-82; Aksoy et al., “Long-Term Stock Market Valuation”; and others.

 

This synopsis was written by Lynn Croft, independent marketing and market research consultant. With 15 years of experience at companies such as Genzyme, Bayer Corporation, Shire, and Eli Lilly, Lynn has expertise in market research, market analysis regarding product launches, pricing and lifecycle management. 

 

[Are you planning your organization’s first customer satisfaction research? Or looking to refresh an existing program? Learn about goal setting, monitoring strategies, and common challenges in our 90-minute, live online Improving Customer Satisfaction class. MRA approved for 1.5 hours of PRC credit.]

 

0 Comments
Jul

Article Synopsis: Still Full of Beanz (Effective Data Management)

Using a philosophy of test and learn, Heinz looks to multiple information sources for research, including electronic-point-of-sale, Nielsen data, panel data, and social media and brand monitoring. One such panel, Heinz 57, is an online community of 300 consumers that the company uses as a source of customer feedback.

0 Comments READ MORE
Jul

Article Synopsis: Seasonal marketing in a social age.

Analysis of actual shopping behavior conducted from mobile devices suggests that conventional definitions of seasonal shopping behaviors are being disrupted by mobile shopping. Beyond the powerful implications for marketers in general, this also has implications for market researchers who may be timing research on purchase plans and branding around seasonal shopping assumptions.

0 Comments READ MORE
Jul

7 Strong: Meet Our Amazing Market Research Instructors

Research Rockstar’s instructor roster is now 7 strong. Well, 8 if you count our founder, Kathryn Korostoff who also teaches. Check out the Research Rockstars who teach our market research classes:….

0 Comments READ MORE
Jul

Kathryn’s rant on too many market research conferences

Ever feel overwhelmed by how many solicitations you get to attend market research conferences? You are not alone! Kathryn recorded a video rant on this topic while driving to work.

0 Comments READ MORE
Jun

Summer Camp for Market Researchers

Registration is now open for Camp Rockstar, a summer training camp for market researchers. Come to Research Rockstar’s summer camp, have a lot of fun learning, and let your expanded market research skills …

0 Comments READ MORE
May

Market Research Lessons from Edward Snowden

Love him or hate him, Edward Snowden is a catalyst for change. How did he do it? And what can we market researchers learn from it?

0 Comments READ MORE
May

Market Research & Lost Mojo: Article Synopsis

Andrew Reid, son of Market Research luminary Angus Reid, says Market Research has “lost its mojo.” In a new article published in Entrepreneur Magazine, Reid states, “In the early 2000s, with the increased use of email, the internet, mobile phones and social media, many companies transformed their way of doing business, but market research companies did not.”

0 Comments READ MORE
May

Yes, Market Research is Work

I’ll be blunt: market research takes real work. Sometimes hard work. And sometimes tedious work. We used to live in a simpler world. Everything was surveys and focus groups. Not that those are easy, but at least their risk factors and best practices are known.

0 Comments READ MORE
Apr

3 Tips to Avoid Bad Market Research Software Purchases

Many companies offer free trials. Take advantage of them. Not only is it good for your budget, it says something about the company. I am always more inclined to trust software companies that have enough confidence in their software features and ease of use to offer trials. In contrast, I am wary of companies that say it isn’t an option. Software is scalable…

0 Comments READ MORE