TMRE Through A Practical Lens

I will be at The Market Research Event on Nov. 8 - 10, 2010 in San Diego, CA!
This week, I have the honor of being a guest blogger at The Market Research Event (TMRE), one of the top US conferences for market research professionals. On each of the 3 days of conference sessions, I’ll be posting an article on the event’s blog. Time permitting, I will post additional articles here, at www.ResearchRockstar.com/blog.

So, what will I be writing about?

In looking over the conference materials, I am nearly overwhelmed by the number of excellent speakers and fascinating topics on the schedule. Clearly, I am going to need a strategy for how to select those topics I can realistically blog about. Towards this end, and after considerable thought, I have a strategy!

The primary lens that I will be using to determine what is blog-worthy will be the content’s contribution to the practical advancement of market research. Have I seen or heard something at TMRE that will contribute to:

Improving reliability of research results?

Improving credibility of research results?

Addressing the need for speed?

The word “practical” is a considered choice. Academically interesting content is…well, interesting…but if it doesn’t always address usefulness. I am sure the challenge here is not unique to market research, but we do seem rather prone to a very high talk-to-results ratio (a lot of talk relative to the amount of action). I have the luxury, as a writer, to invoke a little judgment on what I see—and to prioritize what is worthy of sharing. And from my work with clients who purchase, manage and conduct market research, I know that the priority needs to be on those topics (be they strategies, products, or methods) that address real research challenges: credibility, reliability and speed. Yes, cost is always a factor, but it is typically only an objection if the other three items are insufficiently demonstrated.

So with my chosen lens firmly in place, let the blogging begin!  Check in here for updates: TMRE blog and via twitter @ResearchRocks.

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